Jumat, 24 Oktober 2014

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

ScienceDaily: Top Science News


Without swift influx of substantial aid, Ebola epidemic in Africa poised to explode

Posted: 23 Oct 2014 04:35 PM PDT

The Ebola virus disease epidemic already devastating swaths of West Africa will likely get far worse in the coming weeks and months unless international commitments are significantly and immediately increased, new research predicts.

3-D map of the adolescent universe

Posted: 23 Oct 2014 12:41 PM PDT

Using extremely faint light from galaxies 10.8-billion light years away, scientists have created one of the most complete, three-dimensional maps of a slice of the adolescent universe. The map shows a web of hydrogen gas that varies from low to high density at a time when the universe was made of a fraction of the dark matter we see.

Florida lizards evolve rapidly, within 15 years and 20 generations

Posted: 23 Oct 2014 11:23 AM PDT

Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species -- in as little as 15 years -- as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba.

Highest altitude archaeological sites in the world explored in the Peruvian Andes: Survival in extreme environments

Posted: 23 Oct 2014 11:23 AM PDT

Research conducted at the highest-altitude Pleistocene archaeological sites yet identified in the world sheds new light on the capacity of humans to survive in extreme environments. The findings were taken from sites in the Pucuncho Basin, located in the Southern Peruvian Andes.

Genomic data support early contact between Easter Island and Americas

Posted: 23 Oct 2014 10:16 AM PDT

People may have been making their way from Easter Island to the Americas well before Dutch commander Jakob Roggeveen arrived in 1722, according to new genomic evidence showing that the Rapanui people living on that most isolated of islands had significant contact with Native American populations hundreds of years earlier. The findings lend the first genetic support for such an early trans-Pacific route between Polynesia and the Americas, a trek of more than 4,000 kilometers.

Reminiscing can help boost mental performance

Posted: 23 Oct 2014 08:10 AM PDT

Engaging brain areas linked to so-called 'off-task' mental activities (such as mind-wandering and reminiscing) can actually boost performance on some challenging mental tasks, a new research led by a neuroscientist shows for the first.

Precise, programmable biological circuits

Posted: 23 Oct 2014 07:07 AM PDT

Several new components for biological circuits have been developed by researchers. These components are key building blocks for constructing precisely functioning and programmable bio-computers. "The ability to combine biological components at will in a modular, plug-and-play fashion means that we now approach the stage when the concept of programming as we know it from software engineering can be applied to biological computers. Bio-engineers will literally be able to program in future."
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Kamis, 23 Oktober 2014

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

ScienceDaily: Top Science News


Titan glowing at dusk and dawn

Posted: 22 Oct 2014 02:01 PM PDT

New maps of Saturn's moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles. These regions are curiously shifted off the poles, to the east or west, so that dawn is breaking over the southern region while dusk is falling over the northern one.

Thermal paper cash register receipts account for high bisphenol A (BPA) levels in humans

Posted: 22 Oct 2014 11:36 AM PDT

BPA from thermal paper used in cash register receipts accounts for high levels of BPA in humans. Subjects studied showed a rapid increase of BPA in their blood after using a skin care product and then touching a store receipt with BPA.

Highly effective new anti-cancer drug shows few side effects in mice

Posted: 22 Oct 2014 11:35 AM PDT

A new drug, OTS964, can eradicate aggressive human lung cancers transplanted into mice, scientists report. It inhibits the action of a protein that is overproduced by several tumor types but is rarely expressed in healthy adult tissues. Without it, cancer cells fail to complete the cell-division process and die.

As permafrost soils thaw soil microbes amplify global climate change

Posted: 22 Oct 2014 10:14 AM PDT

Scientists have discovered how an invisible menagerie of microbes in permafrost soils acts as global drivers of Earth processes such as climate via gas exchange between soils and the atmosphere. These findings will help climate modelers more accurately predict Earth's future climate.

Two families of comets found around nearby star: Biggest census ever of exocomets around beta pictoris

Posted: 22 Oct 2014 10:06 AM PDT

The HARPS instrument at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile has been used to make the most complete census of comets around another star ever created. Astronomers have studied nearly 500 individual comets orbiting the star Beta Pictoris and has discovered that they belong to two distinct families of exocomets: old exocomets that have made multiple passages near the star, and younger exocomets that probably came from the recent breakup of one or more larger objects.

Mathematical model shows how brain remains stable during learning

Posted: 22 Oct 2014 09:30 AM PDT

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to an international team of scientists. Neuronal networks form a learning machine that allows the brain to extract and store new information from its surroundings via the senses. Researchers have long puzzled over how the brain achieves sensitivity and stability to unexpected new experiences during learning -- two seemingly contradictory requirements.

Human skin cells reprogrammed directly into brain cells

Posted: 22 Oct 2014 09:30 AM PDT

Scientists have described a way to convert human skin cells directly into a specific type of brain cell affected by Huntington's disease, an ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Unlike other techniques that turn one cell type into another, this new process does not pass through a stem cell phase, avoiding the production of multiple cell types, report researchers.
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