Selasa, 02 September 2014

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

ScienceDaily: Top Science News


New horizon in heart failure: Investigational drug poised to change cardiology

Posted: 30 Aug 2014 08:18 AM PDT

An investigational new heart failure drug could be poised to change the face of cardiology based on Hot Line results. The new agent, known as LCZ696, has already been granted Fast Track status by the FDA -- a designation which can expedite the review of new medicines intended to treat serious or life-threatening conditions. Fast Track designation also allows for rolling submission in the US. "To say that we are excited is an understatement. We are absolutely thrilled," said one investigator.
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Senin, 01 September 2014

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

ScienceDaily: Top Science News


Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds

Posted: 31 Aug 2014 12:03 PM PDT

Early, fast, turbulent mixing of gas within giant molecular clouds -- the birthplaces of stars -- means all stars formed from a single cloud bear the same unique chemical 'tag' or 'DNA fingerprint,' write astrophysicists. Could such chemical tags help astronomers identify our own Sun's long-lost sibling stars?

Changing global diets is vital to reducing climate change

Posted: 31 Aug 2014 12:02 PM PDT

Healthier diets and reducing food waste are part of a combination of solutions needed to ensure food security and avoid dangerous climate change, say the team behind a new study.

New type of cell movement discovered

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 11:27 AM PDT

Scientists have used an innovative technique to study how cells move in a three-dimensional matrix, similar to the structure of certain tissues, such as the skin. They discovered an entirely new type of cell movement whereby the nucleus helps propel cells through the matrix like a piston in an engine.

HIV Lessons from the Mississippi Baby

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 11:26 AM PDT

The news in July, 2014 that HIV had returned in a Mississippi toddler after a two-year treatment-free remission dashed the hopes of clinicians, HIV researchers and the public at large tantalized by the possibility of a cure. But a new commentary by two leading HIV experts argues that despite its disappointing outcome, the Mississippi case and two other recent HIV "rebounds" in adults, have yielded critical lessons about the virus' most perplexing — and maddening — feature: its ability to form cure-defying viral hideouts.
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Minggu, 31 Agustus 2014

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

ScienceDaily: Top Science News


How studying damage to prefrontal lobe has helped unlock the brain's mysteries

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 10:55 AM PDT

Until the last few decades, the frontal lobes of the brain were shrouded in mystery and erroneously thought of as nonessential for normal function. Now a review highlights groundbreaking studies of patients with brain damage that reveal how distinct areas of the frontal lobes are critical for a person's ability to learn, multitask, control emotions, socialize, and make decisions. The findings have helped experts rehabilitate patients experiencing damage to this brain region.
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Sabtu, 30 Agustus 2014

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

ScienceDaily: Top Science News


The universal 'anger face': Each element makes you look physically stronger and more formidable

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 03:48 PM PDT

The next time you get really mad, take a look in the mirror. See the lowered brow, the thinned lips and the flared nostrils? That's what social scientists call the "anger face," and it appears to be part of our basic biology as humans. Now, researchers have identified the functional advantages that caused the specific appearance of the anger face to evolve.

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope witnesses asteroid smashup

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 02:01 PM PDT

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has spotted an eruption of dust around a young star, possibly the result of a smashup between large asteroids. This type of collision can eventually lead to the formation of planets.

Flapping baby birds give clues to origin of flight

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 02:00 PM PDT

The origin of flight is a contentious issue: some argue that tree-climbing dinosaurs learned to fly in order to avoid hard falls. Others favor the story that theropod dinosaurs ran along the ground and pumped their forelimbs to gain lift, eventually talking off. New evidence showing the early development of aerial righting in birds favors the tree-dweller hypothesis.

How the zebrafish gets its stripes: Uncovering how beautiful color patterns can develop in animals

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 11:27 AM PDT

The zebrafish, a small fresh water fish, owes its name to a striking pattern of blue stripes alternating with golden stripes. Three major pigment cell types, black cells, reflective silvery cells, and yellow cells emerge during growth in the skin of the tiny juvenile fish and arrange as a multi-layered mosaic to compose the characteristic color pattern. While it was known that all three cell types have to interact to form proper stripes, the embryonic origin of the pigment cells that develop the stripes of the adult fish has remained a mystery up to now. Scientists have now discovered how these cells arise and behave to form the 'zebra' pattern.

Prehistoric migrations: DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 11:27 AM PDT

A new DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic. We know people have lived in the New World Arctic for about 5,000 years. Archaeological evidence clearly shows that a variety of cultures survived the harsh climate in Alaska, Canada and Greenland for thousands of years. Despite this, there are several unanswered questions about these people.

Home is where the microbes are

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 11:27 AM PDT

A person's home is their castle, and they populate it with their own subjects: millions and millions of bacteria. Scientists have detailed the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The results shed light on the complicated interaction between humans and the microbes that live on and around us. Mounting evidence suggests that these microscopic, teeming communities play a role in human health and disease treatment and transmission.

New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 11:27 AM PDT

The genetic changes that transformed wild animals into domesticated forms have long been a mystery. An international team of scientists has now made a breakthrough by showing that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication. The study gives answers to many genetic questions.

Electric current to brain boosts memory: May help treat memory disorders from stroke, Alzheimer's, brain injury

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 11:27 AM PDT

Stimulating a region in the brain via non-invasive delivery of electrical current using magnetic pulses, called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, improves memory. The discovery opens a new field of possibilities for treating memory impairments caused by conditions such as stroke, early-stage Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, cardiac arrest and the memory problems that occur in healthy aging.

Astronomy: Radio telescopes settle controversy over distance to Pleiades

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 11:27 AM PDT

A worldwide network of radio telescopes measured the distance to the famous star cluster the Pleiades to an accuracy within 1 percent. The result resolved a controversy raised by a satellite's measurement that now is shown to be wrong. The incorrect measurement had challenged standard models of star formation and evolution.

Genomic sequencing reveals mutations, insights into 2014 Ebola outbreak

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 11:27 AM PDT

In response to an ongoing, unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa, a team of researchers has rapidly sequenced and analyzed more than 99 Ebola virus genomes. Their findings could have important implications for rapid field diagnostic tests.

Mystery solved: 'Sailing stones' of Death Valley seen in action for the first time

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 11:19 AM PDT

Racetrack Playa is home to an enduring Death Valley mystery. Littered across the surface of this dry lake, also called a "playa," are hundreds of rocks -- some weighing as much as 320 kilograms (700 pounds) -- that seem to have been dragged across the ground, leaving synchronized trails that can stretch for hundreds of meters.

Nanoscale assembly line: Nanoscale production line for assembly of biological molecules created

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 08:08 AM PDT

Researchers have realized a long-held dream: inspired by an industrial assembly line, they have developed a nanoscale production line for the assembly of biological molecules.
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