Senin, 16 Januari 2017

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

ScienceDaily: Top Science News


How to be winner in the game of evolution

Posted: 13 Jan 2017 04:44 PM PST

A new study helps explain why different groups of animals differ dramatically in their number of species, and how this is related to differences in their body forms and ways of life.

Giant Middle East dust storm caused by a changing climate, not human conflict

Posted: 13 Jan 2017 12:54 PM PST

Researchers have concluded that the most likely cause of a giant dust storm that struck the Middle East in 2015 was climate and unusual weather rather than conflict.

Link found between concussions, Alzheimer's disease

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 08:08 AM PST

Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline in people who are at genetic risk for the condition, research has found. The findings show promise for detecting the influence of concussion on neurodegeneration.
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Minggu, 15 Januari 2017

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

ScienceDaily: Top Science News


Sunbed users get melanoma at a younger age

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 07:58 AM PST

Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer with the strongest increase in incidence in the last decade, and the incidence rates have never been as high. The World Health Organization based International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified UV-emitting tanning devices as "carcinogenic to humans" in 2009, however, sunbed use is still popular in western countries, especially among young women.
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Jumat, 13 Januari 2017

ScienceDaily: Top Science News

ScienceDaily: Top Science News


Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 11:31 AM PST

Baboons produce vocalizations comparable to vowels. This has been demonstrated using acoustic analyses of vocalizations coupled with an anatomical study of the tongue muscles and the modeling of the acoustic potential of the vocal tract in monkeys. The data confirm that baboons are capable of producing at least five vocalizations with the properties of vowels, in spite of their high larynx, and that they are capable of combining them when they communicate with their partners. The vocalizations of baboons thus point to a system of speech among non-human primates.

Master regulator of cellular aging discovered

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 11:13 AM PST

Scientists have discovered a protein that fine-tunes the cellular clock involved in aging.

New system for forming memories

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 11:12 AM PST

Until now, the hippocampus was considered the most important brain region for forming and recalling memory, with other regions only contributing as subordinates. But a new study finds that a brain region called entorhinal cortex plays a new and independent role in memory. Researchers showed that, in rats, the entorhinal cortex replays memories of movement independent of input from the hippocampus.

Improving longevity of functionally integrated stem cells in regenerative vision therapy

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 11:12 AM PST

One of the challenges in developing stem cell therapies is ensuring that transplanted cells can survive long enough to work. Researchers report one of the first demonstrations of long-term vision restoration in blind mice by transplanting photoreceptors derived from human stem cells and blocking the immune response that causes transplanted cells to be rejected. The findings support a path to improving clinical applications in restoring human vision lost to degenerative eye diseases.

Scientists tie the tightest knot ever achieved

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 11:12 AM PST

Scientists have produced the most tightly knotted physical structure ever known -- a scientific achievement which has the potential to create a new generation of advanced materials.

Bacteria recruit other species with long-range electrical signals

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 11:12 AM PST

The same biologists who recently found that bacteria resolve social conflicts within their communities and communicate with one another like neurons in the brain have discovered another human-like trait in these apparently not-so-simple, single-celled creatures.

Biologists discover how viruses hijack cell's machinery

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 11:12 AM PST

Biologists have documented for the first time how very large viruses reprogram the cellular machinery of bacteria during infection to more closely resemble an animal or human cell -- a process that allows these alien invaders to trick cells into producing hundreds of new viruses, which eventually explode from and kill the cells they infect.

Wearable biosensors can flag illness, Lyme disease, risk for diabetes; low airplane oxygen

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 11:11 AM PST

Can your smart watch detect when you are becoming sick? A new study indicates that this is possible. By following 60 people through their everyday lives, researchers found that smart watches and other personal biosensor devices can help flag when people have colds and even signal the onset of complex conditions like Lyme disease and diabetes.

Searching for planets in the Alpha Centauri system

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 10:07 AM PST

Astronomers are conducting a search for planets in the nearby star system Alpha Centauri. Such planets could be the targets for an eventual launch of miniature space probes by the Breakthrough Starshot initiative.

Why do killer whales go through menopause? Mother-daughter conflict is key

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 10:01 AM PST

Killer whales are one of only three species that are known to go through menopause, surviving long after they've stopped reproducing. Those older females play an essential role in helping their younger family members to find food and survive even in lean times. But, researchers report in a new study, the reason older females stop reproducing has more to do with conflict between mothers and their daughters than it does with cooperation.

Scientists switch on predatory kill instinct in mice

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 10:01 AM PST

Researchers have isolated the brain circuitry that coordinates predatory hunting, according to a new study. One set of neurons in the amygdala, the brain's center of emotion and motivation, cues the animal to pursue prey. Another set signals the animal to use its jaw and neck muscles to bite and kill.

Twelve new tombs discovered in Gebel el Silsila, Egypt

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 08:50 AM PST

The Swedish mission at Gebel el Silsila has discovered 12 new tombs dating from the 18th Dynasty (Thutmosid period), including crypts cut into the rock, rock-cut tombs with one or two chambers, niches possibly used for offering, a tomb containing multiple animal burials, and several juvenal burials, some intact.

Viruses in genome important for our brain

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 08:08 AM PST

Over millions of years retroviruses have been incorporated into our human DNA, where they today make up almost 10 per cent of the total genome. A research group has now discovered a mechanism through which these retroviruses may have an impact on gene expression. This means that they may have played a significant role in the development of the human brain as well as in various neurological diseases.

Miami doctors publish study of first locally-acquired Zika transmission

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 08:08 AM PST

Following the recent Zika outbreak in Miami-Dade County, a multidisciplinary team of physicians has published a case study describing in detail the nation's first locally-transmitted case of Zika.

The moon is older than scientists thought

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 08:07 AM PST

The moon is much older than some scientists believe, a research team now reports. Their precise analysis of zircons bought to Earth by Apollo 14 astronauts reveals the moon is at least 4.51 billion years old and probably formed only about 60 million years after the birth of the solar system -- 40 to 140 million years earlier than recently thought.

CRISPR gene editing takes on rare immunodeficiency disorder

Posted: 12 Jan 2017 08:07 AM PST

Researchers have harnessed the CRISPR-Cas9 technology to correct mutations in the blood stem cells of patients with a rare immunodeficiency disorder; the engineered cells successfully engrafted in mice for up to five months.
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